What Part of Speech is Down [ Adjective, Adverb, Noun, Preposition ]

In English, the word “down” can be used as an adjective, an adverb, a preposition, or a noun.

Adjective

As an adjective, “down” is used to indicate a downward direction or position. It can also be used to describe a reduction in amount, degree, or intensity. For example:

  • “The bird flew down from the tree.” (indicating downward direction or position)
  • “She sat down on the couch.” (indicating downward direction or position)
  • “He threw the ball down the field.” (indicating downward direction or position)
  • “Sales are down this month.” (describing a reduction in amount)
  • “The temperature is down from yesterday.” (describing a reduction in degree)

Adverb

As an adverb, “down” is used to indicate a downward direction or movement. It can also be used to describe a decrease in intensity or degree. For example:

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  • “He climbed down the ladder.” (indicating downward movement)
  • “She lay down on the bed.” (indicating downward movement)
  • “I looked down at my feet.” (indicating downward direction)
  • “The volume went down as he spoke.” (describing a decrease in intensity)
  • “The pain is down from yesterday.” (describing a decrease in intensity or degree)

What Part of Speech Down

Preposition

As a preposition, “down” is used to show the relationship between a noun or pronoun and some other word in the sentence. It is used to indicate a downward direction or position. For example:

  • “The cat is sitting down on the floor.” (indicating downward direction or position)
  • “She walked down the street.” (indicating downward direction or position)
  • “He climbed down the ladder.” (indicating downward direction or position)
  • “We looked down at the ground.” (indicating downward direction)
  • “The plane flew down from the sky.” (indicating downward direction or position)
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Noun

As a noun, “down” can refer to the softer fibers of a feather or to a state of depression or low spirits. For example:

  • “She plucked a few downs from the pillow.” (referring to the softer fibers of a feather)
  • “He was feeling down after his breakup.” (referring to a state of depression or low spirits)
  • “She has been down since her dog died.” (referring to a state of depression or low spirits)
  • “He was feeling down in the dumps.” (referring to a state of depression or low spirits)
  • “She has been down in the mouth since her dog died.” (referring to a state of depression or low spirits)

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